Transitioning to Solid Foods

Source: one tough job

Many pediatricians recommend starting with a simple grain cereal, such as oatmeal, because these are easy for infants to digest.

By the time your baby is six months old you will probably have developed a good feeding routine and be able to clearly read her hunger cues. You may begin to notice around this time that she is still hungry after feedings. She will likely be double her birth weight and may have started teething. If she shows these signs and can also hold her head up and sit in a high chair, you should talk with your pediatrician about introducing solids.

Many pediatricians recommend starting with a simple grain cereal, such as oatmeal, because these are easy for infants to digest. It may take some time for your baby to adjust to this new item on the menu, but repeated offerings will help her become more comfortable. When you start her on cereal for the first time, put a little bit of cereal on her mouth or tongue and let her taste it. Slowly she will become more comfortable with how to eat from a spoon.


As your baby adjusts to eating cereal, you can slowly begin introducing other single grains, fruits, and vegetables. After you introduce a new food wait three days before adding any other new food. This will give you time to see if your baby has any allergic reactions to the new fruit, vegetable, or grain. During this period, your baby’s staple diet will still be breast milk and/or formula, but at least one feeding can be 4-5 tablespoons of cereal, fruit, or vegetables. This is an exciting time for you and your baby so enjoy this opportunity to share lots of new foods and flavors with your growing child!

Read this helpful illustration from aboutkidshealth.ca for a straightforward, easy to understand information about introducing solids into your baby’s diet.

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